How to talk to your Rapsberry Pi over an ethernet crossover cable with IP masquerading (Shallow Thoughts)

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing, Science, and Nature.

Fri, 09 Nov 2012

How to talk to your Rapsberry Pi over an ethernet crossover cable with IP masquerading

I've been using my Raspberry Pi mostly headless -- I'm interested in using it to control hardware. Most of my experimenting is at home, where I can plug the Pi's built-in ethernet directly into the wired net.

But what about when I venture away from home, perhaps to a group hacking session, or to give a talk? There's no wired net at most of these places, and although you can buy USB wi-fi dongles, wi-fi is so notoriously flaky that I'd never want to rely on it, especially as my only way of talking to the Pi.

Once or twice I've carried a router along, so I could set up my own subnet -- but that means an extra device, ten times as big as the Pi, and needing its own power supply in a place where power plugs may be scarce.

The real solution is a crossover ethernet cable. (My understanding is that you can't use a normal ethernet cable between two computers; the data send and receive lines will end up crossed. Though I may be wrong about that -- one person on #raspberrypi reported using a normal ethernet cable without trouble.)

Buying a crossover cable at Fry's was entertaining. After several minutes of staring at the dozens of bins of regular ethernet cables, I finally found the one marked crossover, and grabbed it. Immediately, a Fry's employee who had apparently been lurking in the wings rushed over to warn me that this wasn't a normal cable, this wasn't what I wanted, it was a weird special cable. I thanked him and assured him that was exactly what I'd come to buy.

Once home, with my laptop connected to wi-fi, I plugged one end into the Pi and the other end into my laptop ... and now what? How do I configure the network so I can talk to the Pi from the laptop, and the Pi can gateway through the laptop to the internet?

The answer is IP masquerading. Originally I'd hoped to give the Pi a network address on the same networking (192.168.1) as the laptop. When I use the Pi at home, it picks a network address on 192.168.1, and it would be nice not to have to change that when I travel elsewhere. But if that's possible, I couldn't find a way to do it.

Okay, plan B: the laptop is on 192.168.1 (or whatever network the wi-fi happens to assign), while the Pi is on a diffferent network, 192.168.0. That was relatively easy, with some help from the Masquerading Simple Howto.

Once I got it working, I wrote a script, since there are quite a few lines to type and I knew I wouldn't remember them all. Of course, the script has to be run as root. Here's the script, on github: masq.

I had to change one thing from the howto: at the end, when it sets up security, this line is supposed to enable incoming connections on all interfaces except wlan0:

iptables -A INPUT -m state --state NEW -i ! wlan0 -j ACCEPT

But that gave me an error, Bad argument `wlan0'. What worked instead was

iptables -A INPUT -m state --state NEW ! -i wlan0 -j ACCEPT
Only a tiny change: swap the order of -i and !. (I sent a correction to the howto authors but haven't heard back yet.)

All set! It's a nice compact way to talk to your Pi anywhere. Of course, don't forget to label your crossover cable, so you don't accidentally try to use it as a regular ethernet cable. Now please excuse me while I go label mine.

Update: Ed Davies has a great followup, Crossover Cables and Red Tape, that talks about how to set up a subnet if you don't need the full masquerading setup, why non-crossover cables might sometimes work, and a good convention for labeling crossover cables: use red tape. I'm going to adopt that convention too -- thanks, Ed!

Tags: , , ,
[ 15:57 Nov 09, 2012    More hardware | permalink to this entry | comments ]
(Commenting requires Javascript from ShallowSky.com and Disqus.com, and a cookie from Disqus.com.)
blog comments powered by Disqus

Syndicated on:
LinuxChix Live
Ubuntu Women
Women in Free Software
Graphics Planet
DevChix
Ubuntu California
Planet Openbox
Devchix
Planet LCA2009

Friends' Blogs:
Ups & Downs
DailyBBG
Long Live the Village Green
Dan Heller
Morris "Mojo" Jones
Jane Houston Jones

Other Blogs:
DevChix
Scott Adams
Dave Barry
BoingBoing (Cory Doctorow)
Young Female Scientist

Powered by PyBlosxom.