Shallow Thoughts : tags : gtk3

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.

Sun, 24 Dec 2017

Saving a transparent PNG image from Cairo, in Python

Dave and I will be giving a planetarium talk in February on the analemma and related matters.

Our planetarium, which runs a fiddly and rather limited program called Nightshade, has no way of showing the analemma. Or at least, after trying for nearly a week once, I couldn't find a way. But it can show images, and since I once wrote a Python program to plot the analemma, I figured I could use my program to generate the analemmas I wanted to show and then project them as images onto the planetarium dome.

[analemma simulation] But naturally, I wanted to project just the analemma and associated labels; I didn't want the blue background to cover up the stars the planetarium shows. So I couldn't just use a simple screenshot; I needed a way to get my GTK app to create a transparent image such as a PNG.

That turns out to be hard. GTK can't do it (either GTK2 or GTK3), and people wanting to do anything with transparency are nudged toward the Cairo library. As a first step, I updated my analemma program to use Cairo and GTK3 via gi.repository. Then I dove into Cairo.

I found one C solution for converting an existing Cairo surface to a PNG, but I didn't have much luck with it. But I did find a Python program that draws to a PNG without bothering to create a GUI. I could use that.

The important part of that program is where it creates a new Cairo "surface", and then creates a "context" for that surface:

surface = cairo.ImageSurface(cairo.FORMAT_ARGB32, *imagesize)

cr = cairo.Context(surface)

A Cairo surface is like a canvas to draw on, and it knows how to save itself to a PNG image. A context is the equivalent of a GC in X11 programming: it knows about the current color, font and so forth. So the trick is to create a new surface, create a context, then draw everything all over again with the new context and surface.

A Cairo widget will already have a function to draw everything (in my case, the analemma and all its labels), with this signature:

    def draw(self, widget, ctx):

It already allows passing the context in, so passing in a different context is no problem. I added an argument specifying the background color and transparency, so I could use a blue background in the user interface but a transparent background for the PNG image:

    def draw(self, widget, ctx, background=None):

I also had a minor hitch: in draw(), I was saving the context as self.ctx rather than passing it around to every draw routine. That means calling it with the saved image's context would overwrite the one used for the GUI window. So I save it first.

Here's the final image saving code:

   def save_image(self, outfile):
        dst_surface = cairo.ImageSurface(cairo.FORMAT_ARGB32,
                                         self.width, self.height)

        dst_ctx = cairo.Context(dst_surface)

        # draw() will overwrite self.ctx, so save it first:
        save_ctx = self.ctx

        # Draw everything again to the new context,
        # with a transparent instead of an opaque background:
        self.draw(None, dst_ctx, (0, 0, 1, 0))  # transparent blue

        # Restore the GUI context:
        self.ctx = save_ctx

        print("Saved to", outfile)

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[ 19:39 Dec 24, 2017    More programming | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Sat, 07 May 2016

Setting "Emacs" key theme in gtk3 (and Firefox 46)

I recently let Firefox upgrade itself to 46.0.1, and suddenly I couldn't type anything any more. The emacs/readline editing bindings, which I use probably thousands of times a day, no longer worked. So every time I typed a Ctrl-H to delete the previous character, or Ctrl-B to move back one character, a sidebar popped up. When I typed Ctrl-W to delete the last word, it closed the tab. Ctrl-U, to erase the contents of the urlbar, opened a new View Source tab, while Ctrl-N, to go to the next line, opened a new window. Argh!

(I know that people who don't use these bindings are rolling their eyes and wondering "What's the big deal?" But if you're a touch typist, once you've gotten used to being able to edit text without moving your hands from the home position, it's hard to imagine why everyone else seems content with key bindings that require you to move your hands and eyes way over to keys like Backspace or Home/End that aren't even in the same position on every keyboard. I map CapsLock to Ctrl for the same reason, since my hands are too small to hit the PC-positioned Ctrl key without moving my whole hand. Ctrl was to the left of the "A" key on nearly all computer keyboards until IBM's 1986 "101 Enhanced Keyboard", and it made a lot more sense than IBM's redesign since few people use Caps Lock very often.)

I found a bug filed on the broken bindings, and lots of people commenting online, but it wasn't until I found out that Firefox 46 had switched to GTK3 that I understood had actually happened. And adding gtk3 to my web searches finally put me on the track to finding the solution, after trying several other supposed fixes that weren't.

Here's what actually worked: edit ~/.config/gtk-3.0/settings.ini and add, inside the [Settings] section, this line:

gtk-key-theme-name = Emacs

I think that's all that was needed. But in case that doesn't do it, here's something I had already tried, unsuccessfully, and it's possible that you actually need it in addition to the settings.ini change (I don't know how to undo magic Gnome settings so I can't test it):

gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface gtk-key-theme "Emacs"

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[ 18:11 May 07, 2016    More linux | permalink to this entry | comments ]