Shallow Thoughts : tags : povray

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.

Wed, 17 Jul 2019

Ray-Tracing Digital Elevation Data in 3D with Povray (Part III)

This is Part III of a four-part article on ray tracing digital elevation model (DEM) data. The goal: render a ray-traced image of mountains from a digital elevation model (DEM).

In Part II, I showed how the povray camera position and angle need to be adjusted based on the data, and the position of the light source depends on the camera position.

In particular, if the camera is too high, you won't see anything because all the relief will be tiny invisible bumps down below. If it's too low, it might be below the surface and then you can't see anything. If the light source is too high, you'll have no shadows, just a uniform grey surface.

That's easy enough to calculate for a simple test image like the one I used in Part II, where you know exactly what's in the file. But what about real DEM data where the elevations can vary?

Explore Your Test Data

[Hillshade of northern New Mexico mountains] For a test, I downloaded some data that includes the peaks I can see from White Rock in the local Jemez and Sangre de Cristo mountains.

wget -O mountains.tif 'http://opentopo.sdsc.edu/otr/getdem?demtype=SRTMGL3&west=-106.8&south=35.1&east=-105.0&north=36.5&outputFormat=GTiff'

Create a hillshade to make sure it looks like the right region:

gdaldem hillshade mountains.tif hillshade.png
pho hillshade.png
(or whatever your favorite image view is, if not pho). The image at right shows the hillshade for the data I'm using, with a yellow cross added at the location I'm going to use for the observer.

Sanity check: do the lowest and highest elevations look right? Let's look in both meters and feet, using the tricks from Part I.

>>> import gdal
>>> import numpy as np

>>> demdata = gdal.Open('mountains.tif')
>>> demarray = np.array(demdata.GetRasterBand(1).ReadAsArray())
>>> demarray.min(), demarray.max()
(1501, 3974)
>>> print([ x * 3.2808399 for x in (demarray.min(), demarray.max())])
[4924.5406899, 13038.057762600001]

That looks reasonable. Where are those highest and lowest points, in pixel coordinates?

>>> np.where(demarray == demarray.max())
(array([645]), array([1386]))
>>> np.where(demarray == demarray.min())
(array([1667]), array([175]))

Those coordinates are reversed because of the way numpy arrays are organized: (1386, 645) in the image looks like Truchas Peak (the highest peak in this part of the Sangres), while (175, 1667) is where the Rio Grande disappears downstream off the bottom left edge of the map -- not an unreasonable place to expect to find a low point. If you're having trouble eyeballing the coordinates, load the hillshade into GIMP and watch the coordinates reported at the bottom of the screen as you move the mouse.

While you're here, check the image width and height. You'll need it later.

>>> demarray.shape
(1680, 2160)
Again, those are backward: they're the image height, width.

Choose an Observing Spot

Let's pick a viewing spot: Overlook Point in White Rock (marked with the yellow cross on the image above). Its coordinates are -106.1803, 35.827. What are the pixel coordinates? Using the formula from the end of Part I:

>>> import affine
>>> affine_transform = affine.Affine.from_gdal(*demdata.GetGeoTransform())
>>> inverse_transform = ~affine_transform
>>> [ round(f) for f in inverse_transform * (-106.1803, 35.827) ]
[744, 808]

Just to double-check, what's the elevation at that point in the image? Note again that the numpy array needs the coordinates in reverse order: Y first, then X.

>>> demarray[808, 744], demarray[808, 744] * 3.28
(1878, 6159.839999999999)

1878 meters, 6160 feet. That's fine for Overlook Point. We have everything we need to set up a povray file.

Convert to PNG

As mentioned in Part II, povray will only accept height maps as a PNG file, so use gdal_translate to convert:

gdal_translate -ot UInt16 -of PNG mountains.tif mountains.png

Use the Data to Set Camera and Light Angles

The camera should be at the observer's position, and povray needs that as a line like

    location <rightward, upward, forward>
where those numbers are fractions of 1.

The image size in pixels is 2160x1680, and the observer is at pixel location (744, 808). So the first and third coordinates of location should be 744/2160 and 808/1680, right? Well, almost. That Y coordinate of 808 is measured from the top, while povray measures from the bottom. So the third coordinate is actually 1. - 808/1680.

Now we need height, but how do you normalize that? That's another thing nobody seems to document anywhere I can find; but since we're using a 16-bit PNG, I'll guess the maximum is 216 or 65536. That's meters, so DEM files can specify some darned high mountains! So that's why that location <0, .25, 0> line I got from the Mapping Hacks book didn't work: it put the camera at .25 * 65536 or 16,384 meters elevation, waaaaay up high in the sky.

My observer at Overlook Point is at 1,878 meters elevation, which corresponds to a povray height of 1878/65536. I'll use the same value for the look_at height to look horizontally. So now we can calculate all three location coordinates: 744/2160 = .3444, 1878/65536 = 0.0287, 1. - 808/1680 = 0.5190:

    location <.3444, 0.0287, .481>

Povray Glitches

Except, not so fast: that doesn't work. Remember how I mentioned in Part II that povray doesn't work if the camera location is at ground level? You have to put the camera some unspecified minimum distance above ground level before you see anything. I fiddled around a bit and found that if I multiplied the ground level height by 1.15 it worked, but 1.1 wasn't enough. I have no idea whether that will work in general. All I can tell you is, if you're setting location to be near ground level and the generated image looks super dark regardless of where your light source is, try raising your location a bit higher. I'll use 1878/65536 * 1.15 = 0.033.

For a first test, try setting look_at to some fixed place in the image, like the center of the top (north) edge (right .5, forward 1):

    location <.3444, 0.033, .481>
    look_at <.5, 0.033, 1>

That means you won't be looking exactly north, but that's okay, we're just testing and will worry about that later. The middle value, the elevation, is the same as the camera elevation so the camera will be pointed horizontally. (look_at can be at ground level or even lower, if you want to look down.)

Where should the light source be? I tried to be clever and put the light source at some predictable place over the observer's right shoulder, and most of the time it didn't work. I ended up just fiddling with the numbers until povray produced visible terrain. That's another one of those mysterious povray quirks. This light source worked fairly well for my DEM data, but feel free to experiment:

light_source { <2, 1, -1> color <1,1,1> }

All Together Now

Put it all together in a mountains.pov file:

camera {
    location <.3444, 0.0330, .481>
    look_at <.5, 0.0287, 1>
}

light_source { <2, 1, -1> color <1,1,1> }

height_field {
    png "mountains.png"
    smooth
    pigment {
        gradient y
        color_map {
            [ 0 color <.7 .7 .7> ]
            [ 1 color <1 1 1> ]
        }
    }
    scale <1, 1, 1>
}
[Povray-rendering of Black and Otowi Mesas from Overlook Point] Finally, you can run povray and generate an image!
povray +A +W800 +H600 +INAME_OF_POV_FILE +OOUTPUT_PNG_FILE

And once I finally got to this point I could immediately see it was correct. That's Black Mesa (Tunyo) out in the valley a little right of center, and I can see White Rock canyon in the foreground with Otowi Peak on the other side of the canyon. (I strongly recommend, when you experiment with this, that you choose a scene that's very distinctive and very familiar to you, otherwise you'll never be sure if you got it right.)

Next Steps

Now I've accomplished my goal: taking a DEM map and ray-tracing it. But I wanted even more. I wanted a 360-degree panorama of all the mountains around my observing point.

Povray can't do that by itself, but in Part IV, I'll show how to make a series of povray renderings and stitch them together into a panorama. Part IV, Making a Panorama from Raytraced DEM Images

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[ 16:43 Jul 17, 2019    More mapping | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Fri, 12 Jul 2019

Height Fields in Povray (Ray Tracing Elevation Data, Part II)

This is Part II of a four-part article on ray tracing digital elevation model (DEM) data. (Actually, it's looking like there may be five or more parts in the end.)

The goal: render a ray-traced image of mountains from a digital elevation model (DEM).

My goal for that DEM data was to use ray tracing to show the elevations of mountain peaks as if you're inside the image looking out at those peaks.

I'd seen the open source ray tracer povray used for that purpose in the book Mapping Hacks: Tips & Tools for Electronic Cartography: Hack 20, "Make 3-D Raytraced Terrain Models", discusses how to use it for DEM data.

Unfortunately, the book is a decade out of date now, and lots of things have changed. When I tried following the instructions in Hack 20, no matter what DEM file I used as input I got the same distorted grey rectangle. Figuring out what was wrong meant understanding how povray works, which involved a lot of testing and poking since the documentation isn't clear.

Convert to PNG

Before you can do anything, convert the DEM file to a 16-bit greyscale PNG, the only format povray accepts for what it calls height fields:

gdal_translate -ot UInt16 -of PNG demfile.tif demfile.png

If your data is in some format like ArcGIS that has multiple files, rather than a single GeoTIFF file, try using the name of the directory containing the files in place of a filename.

Set up the .pov file

Now create a .pov file, which will look something like this:

camera {
    location <.5, .5, 2>
    look_at  <.5, .6, 0>
}

light_source { <0, 2, 1> color <1,1,1> }

height_field {
    png "YOUR_DEM_FILE.png"

    smooth
    pigment {
        gradient y
        color_map {
            [ 0 color <.5 .5 .5> ]
            [ 1 color <1 1 1> ]
        }
    }

    scale <1, 1, 1>
}

The trick is setting up the right values for the camera and light source. Coordinates like the camera location and look_at, are specified by three numbers that represent <rightward, upward, forward> as a fraction of the image size.

Imagine your DEM tilting forward to lie flat in front of you: the bottom (southern) edge of your DEM image corresponds to 0 forward, whereas the top (northern) edge is 1 forward. 0 in the first coordinate is the western edge, 1 is the eastern. So, for instance, if you want to put the virtual camera at the middle of the bottom (south) edge of your DEM and look straight north and horizontally, neither up nor down, you'd want:

    location <.5, HEIGHT, 0>
    look_at  <.5, HEIGHT, 1>
(I'll talk about HEIGHT in a minute.)

It's okay to go negative, or to use numbers bigger than zero; that just means a coordinate that's outside the height map. For instance, a camera location of

    location <-1, HEIGHT, 2>
would be off the west and north edges of the area you're mapping.

look_at, as you might guess, is the point the camera is looking at. Rather than specify an angle, you specify a point in three dimensions which defines the camera's angle.

What about HEIGHT? If you make it too high, you won't see anything because the relief in your DEM will be too far below you and will disappear. That's what happened with the code from the book: it specified location <0, .25, 0>, which, in current DEM files, means the camera is about 16,000 feet up in the sky, so high that the mountains shrink to invisibility.

If you make the height too low, then everything disappears because ... well, actually I don't know why. If it's 0, then you're most likely underground and I understand why you can't see anything, but you have to make it significantly higher than ground level, and I'm not sure why. Seems to be a povray quirk.

Once you have a .pov file with the right camera and light source, you can run povray like this:

povray +A +W800 +H600 +Idemfile.pov +Orendered.png
then take a look at rendered.png in your favorite image viewer.

Simple Sample Data

['bowling pin' sample DEM for testing povray] There's not much documentation for any of this. There's povray: Placing the Camera, but it doesn't explain details like which number controls which dimension or why it doesn't work if you're too high or too low. To figure out how it worked, I made a silly little test image in GIMP consisting of some circles with fuzzy edges. Those correspond to very tall pillars with steep sides: in these height maps, white means the highest point possible, black means the lowest.

Then I tried lots of different values for location and look_at until I understood what was going on.

For my bowling-pin image, it turned out looking northward (upward) from the south (the bottom of the image) didn't work, because the pillar at the point of the triangle blocked everything else. It turned out to be more useful to put the camera beyond the top (north side) of the image and look southward, back toward the image.

    location <.5, HEIGHT, 2>
    look_at  <.5, HEIGHT, 0>

[povray ray-traced bowling pin result]

The position of the light_source is also important. For instance, for my circles, the light source given in the original hack, <0, 3000, 0>, is so high that the pillars aren't visible at all, because the light is shining only on their tops and not on their sides. (That was also true for most DEM data I tried to view.) I had to move the light source much lower, so it illuminated the sides of the pillars and cast some shadows, and that was true for DEM data as well.

The .pov file above, with the camera halfway up the field (.5) and situated in the center of the north end of the field, looking southward and just slightly up from horizontal (.6), rendered like this. I can't explain the two artifacts in the middle. The artifacts at the tops and bottoms of the pillars are presumably rounding errors and don't worry me.

Finally, I felt like I was getting a handle on povray camera positioning. The next step was to apply it to real Digital Elevation Maps files. I'll cover that in Part III, Povray on real DEM data: Ray-Tracing Digital Elevation Data in 3D with Povray

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[ 18:02 Jul 12, 2019    More mapping | permalink to this entry | comments ]