Banishing errant tooltips (Shallow Thoughts)

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing, Science, and Nature.

Tue, 27 Sep 2011

Banishing errant tooltips

Every now and then I have to run a program that doesn't manage its tooltips well. I mouse over some button to find out what it does, a tooltip pops up -- but then the tooltip won't go away. Even if I change desktops, the tooltip follows me and stays up on all desktops. Worse, it's set to stay on top of all other windows, so it blocks anything underneath it.

The places where I see this happen most often are XEphem (probably as an artifact of the broken Motif libraries we're stuck with on Linux); Adobe's acroread (Acrobat Reader), though perhaps that's gotten better since I last used it; and Wine.

I don't use Wine much, but lately I've had to use it for a medical imaging program that doesn't seem to have a Linux equivalent (viewing PETscan data). Every button has a tooltip, and once a tooltip pops up, it never goes aawy. Eventually I might have five of six of these little floating windows getting in the way of whatever I'm doing on other desktops, until I quit the wine program.

So how does one get rid of errant tooltips littering your screen? Could I write an Xlib program that could nuke them?

Finding window type

First we need to know what's special about tooltip windows, so the program can identify them. First I ran my wine program and produced some sticky tooltips.

Once they were up, I ran xwininfo and clicked on a tooltip. It gave me a bunch of information about the windows size and location, color depth, etc. ... but the useful part is this:

  Override Redirect State: yes

In X, override-redirect windows are windows that are immune to being controlled by the window manager. That's why they don't go away when you change desktops, or move when you move the parent window.

So what if I just find all override-redirect windows and unmap (hide) them? Or would that kill too many innocent victims?

Python-Xlib

I thought I'd have to write my little app in C, since it's doing low-level Xlib calls. But no -- there's a nice set of Python bindings, python-xlib. The documentation isn't great, but it was still pretty easy to whip something up.

The first thing I needed was a window list: I wanted to make sure I could find all the override-redirect windows. Here's how to do that:

from Xlib import display

dpy = display.Display()
screen = dpy.screen()
root = screen.root
tree = root.query_tree()

for w in tree.children :
    print w

w is a Window (documented here). I see in the documentation that I can get_attributes(). I'd also like to know which window is which -- calling get_wm_name() seems like a reasonable way to do that. Maybe if I print them, those will tell me how to find the override-redirect windows:

for w in tree.children :
    print w.get_wm_name(), w.get_attributes()

Window type, redux

Examining the list, I could see that override_redirect was one of the attributes. But there were quite a lot of override-redirect windows. It turns out many apps, such as Firefox, use them for things like menus. Most of the time they're not visible. But you can look at w.get_attributes().map_state to see that.

So that greatly reduced the number of windows I needed to examine:

for w in tree.children :
    att = w.get_attributes()
    if att.map_state and att.override_redirect :
        print w.get_wm_name(), att

I learned that tooltips from well-behaved programs like Firefox tended to set wm_name to the contents of the tooltip. Wine doesn't -- the wine tooltips had an empty string for wm_name. If I wanted to kill just the wine tooltips, that might be useful to know.

But I also noticed something more important: the tooltip windows were also "transient for" their parent windows. Transient for means a temporary window popped up on behalf of a parent window; it's kept on top of its parent window, and goes away when the parent does.

Now I had a reasonable set of attributes for the windows I wanted to unmap. I tried it:

for w in tree.children :
    att = w.get_attributes()
    if att.map_state and att.override_redirect and w.get_wm_transient_for():
        w.unmap()

It worked! At least in my first test: I ran the wine program, made a tooltip pop up, then ran my killtips program ... and the tooltip disappeared.

Multiple tooltips: flushing the display

But then I tried it with several tooltips showing (yes, wine will pop up new tooltips without hiding the old ones first) and the result wasn't so good. My program only hid the first tooltip. If I ran it again, it would hide the second, and again for the third. How odd!

I wondered if there might be a timing problem. Adding a time.sleep(1) after each w.unmap() fixed it, but sleeping surely wasn't the right solution.

But X is asynchronous: things don't necessarily happen right away. To force (well, at least encourage) X to deal with any queued events it might have stacked up, you can call dpy.flush().

I tried adding that after each w.unmap(), and it worked. But it turned out I only need one

dpy.flush()
at the end of the program, just exiting. Apparently if I don't do that, only the first unmap ever gets executed by the X server, and the rest are discarded. Sounds like flush() is a good idea as the last line of any python-xlib program.

killtips will hide tooltips from well-behaved programs too. If you have any tooltips showing in Firefox or any GTK programs, or any menus visible, killtips will unmap them. If I wanted to make sure the program only attacked the ones generated by wine, I could add an extra test on whether w.get_wm_name() == "".

But in practice, it doesn't seem to be a problem. Well-behaved programs handle having their tooltips unmapped just fine: the next time you call up a menu or a tooltip, the program will re-map it.

Not so in wine: once you dismiss one of those wine tooltips, it's gone forever, at least until you quit and restart the program. But that doesn't bother me much: once I've seen the tooltip for a button and found out what that button does, I'm probably not going to need to see it again for a while.

So I'm happy with killtips, and I think it will solve the problem. Here's the full script: killtips.

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[ 10:36 Sep 27, 2011    More programming | permalink to this entry | comments ]
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