My observing report

As I drove up the winding road to another winding road only known to those from my support group, I idly mused upon the morality of Doonsbury as I contemplated the ominous thunderheads on the horizon. When I arrived at the parking lot, it was filled with friends eager for a night's observing. I counted at least 7 telescopes set up.

I started my night's observing with one of my favorite objects, M 100. It seemed fainter than a faint puff of nothingness, with a suspected, but not confirmed, central star. Then, for a real challenge, I star-hopped to M 82 in Sculptor. It was a dead ringer for an inflamed monkey butt. Then, I looked at IC 1937. It shimmered, as if it were the last six objects I'd seen. Next, I checked off M 66. It appeared at low power like a hamburger. (Hmm, it had been a while since dinner). Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I helped a beginner find IC 1088 in Ophiuchus. It was even more difficult than two scoops of spumoni ice cream. After that, I added to my logbook M 36. It shimmered, as if it were the eternal nothingness of being.

After a short break to listen to Mozart, I added to my logbook NGC 4234. It seemed most like an edge-on barred spiral with a sharp dust lane. Next, I had a chance to see B 489. It appeared at low power like a faint puff of nothingness, with a suspected, but not confirmed, central star. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I showed some guests IC 237. It compared favorably with a whale spouting. Then, I observed IC 2584 in Hydra. It seemed fainter than the invisible man.

Finally, it was time to pack up and leave. As I drove home, I contemplated the events of the night, and realized that any night out under the sky with good friends is better than being ravaged by savage wild wombats.


    ...Akkana (with help from David North, Jane Houston Jones, and Bill Arnett) .

(Don't forget to hit reload.)