My observing report

As I drove up the winding road to Devastated Area, I idly mused upon the inner workings of the energy crisis as I contemplated the El Nino weather patterns. When I arrived at the parking lot, it was filled with friends eager for a night's observing. I counted at least 55 telescopes set up.

I started my night's observing with one of my favorite objects, M 26. It would be easy to confuse with cotton candy. After that, I went for Abell 64. It looked a bit like a glimmer of the Big Bang. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I had a chance to see IC 1832 in Septans. It looked a bit like a far-away cloud.

After a short break to chat, I looked for and suspected NGC 4553. It was a blurry likeness of an edge-on barred spiral with a sharp dust lane.

After a short break to check my email, I observed B 50. It seemed just like a smoke ring. Next, attacking my personal nemesis, I tracked down NGC 4951. It was as bright as desert sand. After I'd spent a few minutes looking at that, I checked out M 79. It shimmered, as if it were the eye of God. After that, I looked for and suspected B 267. It was as bright as diamonds on black velvet.

Finally, it was time to pack up and leave. As I drove home, I contemplated the events of the night, and realized that any night out under the sky with good friends is better than reading observing reports.


    ...Akkana (with help from David North, Jane Houston Jones, and Bill Arnett) .

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