Using strace to find configuration file locations (Shallow Thoughts)

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.

Tue, 02 Sep 2014

Using strace to find configuration file locations

I was using strace to figure out how to set up a program, lftp, and a friend commented that he didn't know how to use it and would like to learn. I don't use strace often, but when I do, it's indispensible -- and it's easy to use. So here's a little tutorial.

My problem, in this case, was that I needed to find out what configuration file I needed to modify in order to set up an alias in lftp. The lftp man page tells you how to define an alias, but doesn't tell you how to save it for future sessions; apparently you have to edit the configuration file yourself.

But where? The man page suggested a couple of possible config file locations -- ~/.lftprc and ~/.config/lftp/rc -- but neither of those existed. I wanted to use the one that already existed. I had already set up bookmarks in lftp and it remembered them, so it must have a config file already, somewhere. I wanted to find that file and use it.

So the question was, what files does lftp read when it starts up? strace lets you snoop on a program and see what it's doing.

strace shows you all system calls being used by a program. What's a system call? Well, it's anything in section 2 of the Unix manual. You can get a complete list by typing: man 2 syscalls (you may have to install developer man pages first -- on Debian that's the manpages-dev package). But the important thing is that most file access calls -- open, read, chmod, rename, unlink (that's how you remove a file), and so on -- are system calls.

You can run a program under strace directly:

$ strace lftp sitename
Interrupt it with Ctrl-C when you've seen what you need to see.

Pruning the output

And of course, you'll see tons of crap you're not interested in, like rt_sigaction(SIGTTOU) and fcntl64(0, F_GETFL). So let's get rid of that first. The easiest way is to use grep. Let's say I want to know every file that lftp opens. I can do it like this:

$ strace lftp sitename |& grep open

I have to use |& instead of just | because strace prints its output on stderr instead of stdout.

That's pretty useful, but it's still too much. I really don't care to know about strace opening a bazillion files in /usr/share/locale/en_US/LC_MESSAGES, or libraries like /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libp11-kit.so.0.

In this case, I'm looking for config files, so I really only want to know which files it opens in my home directory. Like this:

$ strace lftp sitename |& grep 'open.*/home/akkana'

In other words, show me just the lines that have either the word "open" or "read" followed later by the string "/home/akkana".

Digression: grep pipelines

Now, you might think that you could use a simpler pipeline with two greps:

$ strace lftp sitename |& grep open | grep /home/akkana

But that doesn't work -- nothing prints out. Why? Because grep, under certain circumstances that aren't clear to me, buffers its output, so in some cases when you pipe grep | grep, the second grep will wait until it has collected quite a lot of output before it prints anything. (This comes up a lot with tail -f as well.) You can avoid that with

$ strace lftp sitename |& grep --line-buffered open | grep /home/akkana
but that's too much to type, if you ask me.

Back to that strace | grep

Okay, whichever way you grep for open and your home directory, it gives:

open("/home/akkana/.local/share/lftp/bookmarks", O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE) = 5
open("/home/akkana/.netrc", O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE) = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
open("/home/akkana/.local/share/lftp/rl_history", O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE) = 5
open("/home/akkana/.inputrc", O_RDONLY|O_LARGEFILE) = 5
Now we're getting somewhere! The file where it's getting its bookmarks is ~/.local/share/lftp/bookmarks -- and I probably can't use that to set my alias.

But wait, why doesn't it show lftp trying to open those other config files?

Using script to save the output

At this point, you might be sick of running those grep pipelines over and over. Most of the time, when I run strace, instead of piping it through grep I run it under script to save the whole output.

script is one of those poorly named, ungoogleable commands, but it's incredibly useful. It runs a subshell and saves everything that appears in that subshell, both what you type and all the output, in a file.

Start script, then run lftp inside it:

$ script /tmp/lftp.strace
Script started on Tue 26 Aug 2014 12:58:30 PM MDT
$ strace lftp sitename

After the flood of output stops, I type Ctrl-D or Ctrl-C to exit lftp, then another Ctrl-D to exit the subshell script is using. Now all the strace output was in /tmp/lftp.strace and I can grep in it, view it in an editor or anything I want.

So, what files is it looking for in my home directory and why don't they show up as open attemps?

$ grep /home/akkana /tmp/lftp.strace

Ah, there it is! A bunch of lines like this:

access("/home/akkana/.lftprc", R_OK)    = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
stat64("/home/akkana/.lftp", 0xbff821a0) = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
mkdir("/home/akkana/.config", 0755)     = -1 EEXIST (File exists)
mkdir("/home/akkana/.config/lftp", 0755) = -1 EEXIST (File exists)
access("/home/akkana/.config/lftp/rc", R_OK) = 0

So I should have looked for access and stat as well as open. Now I have the list of files it's looking for. And, curiously, it creates ~/.config/lftp if it doesn't exist already, even though it's not going to write anything there.

So I created ~/.config/lftp/rc and put my alias there. Worked fine. And I was able to edit my bookmark in ~/.local/share/lftp/bookmarks later when I had a need for that. All thanks to strace.

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[ 13:06 Sep 02, 2014    More linux/cmdline | permalink to this entry | comments ]
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