Shallow Thoughts

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.

Sun, 28 Jun 2015

Chollas in bloom, and other early summer treats

[Bee in cholla blossom] We have three or four cholla cacti on our property. Impressive, pretty cacti, but we were disappointed last year that they never bloomed. They looked like they were forming buds ... and then one day the buds were gone. We thought maybe some animal ate them before the flowers had a chance to open.

Not this year! All of our chollas have gone crazy, with the early rain followed by hot weather. Last week we thought they were spectacular, but they just kept getting better and better. In the heat of the day, it's a bee party: they're aswarm with at least three species of bees and wasps (I don't know enough about bees to identify them, but I can tell they're different from one another) plus some tiny gnat-like insects.

I wrote a few weeks ago about the piñons bursting with cones. What I didn't realize was that these little red-brown cones are all the male, pollen-bearing cones. The ones that bear the seeds, apparently, are the larger bright green cones, and we don't have many of those. But maybe they're just small now, and there will be more later. Keeping fingers crossed. The tall spikes of new growth are called "candles" and there are lots of those, so I guess the trees are happy.

[Desert willow in bloom] Other plants besides cacti are blooming. Last fall we planted a desert willow from a local native plant nursery. The desert willow isn't actually native to White Rock -- we're around the upper end of its elevation range -- but we missed the Mojave desert willow we'd planted back in San Jose, and wanted to try one of the Southwest varieties here. Apparently they're all the same species, Chilopsis linearis.

But we didn't expect the flowers to be so showy! A couple of blossoms just opened today for the first time, and they're as beautiful as any of the cultivated flowers in the garden. I think that means our willow is a 'Rio Salado' type.

Not all the growing plants are good. We've been keeping ourselves busy pulling up tumbleweed (Russian thistle) and stickseed while they're young, trying to prevent them from seeding. But more on that in a separate post.

As I write this, a bluebird is performing short aerobatic flights outside the window. Curiously, it's usually the female doing the showy flying; there's a male out there too, balancing himself on a piñon candle, but he doesn't seem to feel the need to show off. Is the female catching flies, showing off for the male, or just enjoying herself? I don't know, but I'm happy to have bluebirds around. Still no definite sign of whether anyone's nesting in our bluebird box. We have ash-throated flycatchers paired up nearby too, and I'm told they use bluebird boxes more than the bluebirds do. They're both beautiful birds, and welcome here.

Image gallery: Chollas in bloom (and other early summer flowers.

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[ 19:38 Jun 28, 2015    More nature | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Tue, 23 Jun 2015

Cross-Platform Android Development Toolkits: Kivy vs. PhoneGap / Cordova

Although Ant builds have made Android development much easier, I've long been curious about the cross-platform phone development apps: you write a simple app in some common language, like HTML or Python, then run something that can turn it into apps on multiple mobile platforms, like Android, iOS, Blackberry, Windows phone, UbuntoOS, FirefoxOS or Tizen.

Last week I tried two of the many cross-platform mobile frameworks: Kivy and PhoneGap.

Kivy lets you develop in Python, which sounded like a big plus. I went to a Kivy talk at PyCon a year ago and it looked pretty interesting. PhoneGap takes web apps written in HTML, CSS and Javascript and packages them like native applications. PhoneGap seems much more popular, but I wanted to see how it and Kivy compared. Both projects are free, open source software.

If you want to skip the gory details, skip to the summary: how do Kivy and PhoneGap compare?

PhoneGap

I tried PhoneGap first. It's based on Node.js, so the first step was installing that. Debian has packages for nodejs, so apt-get install nodejs npm nodejs-legacy did the trick. You need nodejs-legacy to get the "node" command, which you'll need for installing PhoneGap.

Now comes a confusing part. You'll be using npm to install ... something. But depending on which tutorial you're following, it may tell you to install and use either phonegap or cordova.

Cordova is an Apache project which is intertwined with PhoneGap. After reading all their FAQs on the subject, I'm as confused as ever about where PhoneGap ends and Cordova begins, which one is newer, which one is more open-source, whether I should say I'm developing in PhoneGap or Cordova, or even whether I should be asking questions on the #phonegap or #cordova channels on Freenode. (The one question I had, which came up later in the process, I asked on #phonegap and got a helpful answer very quickly.) Neither one is packaged in Debian.

After some searching for a good, comprehensive tutorial, I ended up on a The Cordova tutorial rather than a PhoneGap one. So I typed:

sudo npm install -g cordova

Once it's installed, you can create a new app, add the android platform (assuming you already have android development tools installed) and build your new app:

cordova create hello com.example.hello HelloWorld
cordova platform add android
cordova build

Oops!

Error: Please install Android target: "android-22"
Apparently Cordova/Phonegap can only build with its own preferred version of android, which currently is 22. Editing files to specify android-19 didn't work for me; it just gave errors at a different point.

So I fired up the Android SDK manager, selected android-22 for install, accepted the license ... and waited ... and waited. In the end it took over two hours to download the android-22 SDK; the system image is 13Gb! So that's a bit of a strike against PhoneGap.

While I was waiting for android-22 to download, I took a look at Kivy.

Kivy

As a Python enthusiast, I wanted to like Kivy best. Plus, it's in the Debian repositories: I installed it with sudo apt-get install python-kivy python-kivy-examples

They have a nice quickstart tutorial for writing a Hello World app on their site. You write it, run it locally in python to bring up a window and see what the app will look like. But then the tutorial immediately jumps into more advanced programming without telling you how to build and deploy your Hello World. For Android, that information is in the Android Packaging Guide. They recommend an app called Buildozer (cute name), which you have to pull from git, build and install.

buildozer init
buildozer android debug deploy run
got started on building ... but then I noticed that it was attempting to download and build its own version of apache ant (sort of a Java version of make). I already have ant -- I've been using it for weeks for building my own Java android apps. Why did it want a different version?

The file buildozer.spec in your project's directory lets you uncomment and customize variables like:

# (int) Android SDK version to use
android.sdk = 21

# (str) Android NDK directory (if empty, it will be automatically downloaded.)
# android.ndk_path = 

# (str) Android SDK directory (if empty, it will be automatically downloaded.)
# android.sdk_path = 

Unlike a lot of Android build packages, buildozer will not inherit variables like ANDROID_SDK, ANDROID_NDK and ANDROID_HOME from your environment; you must edit buildozer.spec.

But that doesn't help with ant. Fortunately, when I inspected the Python code for buildozer itself, I discovered there was another variable that isn't mentioned in the default spec file. Just add this line:

android.ant_path = /usr/bin

Next, buildozer gave me a slew of compilation errors:

kivy/graphics/opengl.c: No such file or directory
 ... many many more lines of compilation interspersed with errors
kivy/graphics/vbo.c:1:2: error: #error Do not use this file, it is the result of a failed Cython compilation.

I had to ask on #kivy to solve that one. It turns out that the current version of cython, 0.22, doesn't work with kivy stable. My choices were to uninstall kivy and pull the development version from git, or to uninstall cython and install version 0.21.2 via pip. I opted for the latter option. Either way, there's no "make clean", so removing the dist and build directories let me start over with the new cython.

apt-get purge cython
sudo pip install Cython==0.21.2
rm -rf ./.buildozer/android/platform/python-for-android/dist
rm -rf ./.buildozer/android/platform/python-for-android/build

Buildozer was now happy, and proceeded to download and build Python-2.7.2, pygame and a large collection of other Python libraries for the ARM platform. Apparently each app packages the Python language and all libraries it needs into the Android .apk file.

Eventually I ran into trouble because I'd named my python file hello.py instead of main.py; apparently this is something you're not allowed to change and they don't mention it in the docs, but that was easily solved. Then I ran into trouble again:

Exception: Unable to find capture version in ./main.py (looking for `__version__ = ['"](.*)['"]`)
The buildozer.spec file offers two types of versioning: by default "method 1" is enabled, but I never figured out how to get past that error with "method 1" so I commented it out and uncommented "method 2". With that, I was finally able to build an Android package.

The .apk file it created was quite large because of all the embedded Python libraries: for the little 77-line pong demo, /usr/share/kivy-examples/tutorials/pong in the Debian kivy-examples package, the apk came out 7.3Mb. For comparison, my FeedViewer native java app, roughly 2000 lines of Java plus a few XML files, produces a 44k apk.

The next step was to make a real mini app. But when I looked through the Kivy examples, they all seemed highly specialized, and I couldn't find any documentation that addressed issues like what widgets were available or how to lay them out. How do I add a basic text widget? How do I put a button next to it? How do I get the app to launch in portrait rather than landscape mode? Is there any way to speed up the very slow initialization?

I'd spent a few hours on Kivy and made a Hello World app, but I was having trouble figuring out how to do anything more. I needed a change of scenery.

PhoneGap, redux

By this time, android-22 had finally finished downloading. I was ready to try PhoneGap again.

This time,

cordova platforms add android
cordova build
worked fine. It took a long time, because it downloaded the huge gradle build system rather than using something simpler like ant. I already have a copy of gradle somewhere (I downloaded it for the OsmAnd build), but it's not in my path, and I was too beaten down by this point to figure out where it was and how to get cordova to point to it.

Cordova eventually produced a 1.8Mb "hello world" apk -- a quarter the size of the Kivy package, though 20 times as big as a native Java app. Deployed on Android, it initialized much faster than the Kivy app, and came up in portrait mode but rotated correctly if I rotated the phone.

Editing the HTML, CSS and Javascript was fairly simple. You'll want to replace pretty much all of the default CSS if you don't want your app monopolized by the Cordova icon.

The only tricky part was file access: opening a file:// URL didn't work. I asked on #phonegap and someone helpfully told me I'd need the file plugin. That was easy to find in the documentation, and I added it like this:

cordova plugin search file
cordova plugin add org.apache.cordova.file

My final apk, for a small web app I use regularly on Android, was almost the same size as their hello world example: 1.8Mb. And it works great: phonegap had no problem playing an audio clip, something that was tricky when I was trying to do the same thing from a native Android java WebView class.

Summary: How do Kivy and PhoneGap compare?

This has been a long article, I know. So how do Kivy and PhoneGap compare, and which one will I be using?

They both need a large amount of disk space for the development environment. I wish I had good numbers to give you, but I was working with both systems at the same time, and their packages are scattered all over the disk so I haven't found a good way of measuring their size. I suspect PhoneGap is quite a bit bigger, because it uses gradle rather than ant and because it insists on android-22.

On the other hand, PhoneGap wins big on packaged application size: its .apk files are a quarter the size of Kivy's.

PhoneGap definitely wins on documentation. Kivy has seemingly lots of documentation, but its tutorials jumped around rather than following a logical sequence, and I had trouble finding answers to basic questions like "How do I display a text field with a button?" PhoneGap doesn't need that, because the UI is basic HTML and CSS -- limited though they are, at least most people know how to use them.

Finally, PhoneGap wins on startup speed. For my very simple test app, startup was more or less immediate, while the Kivy Hello World app required several seconds of startup time on my Galaxy S4.

Kivy is an interesting project. I like the ant-based build, the straightforward .spec file, and of course the Python language. But it still has some catching up to do in performance and documentation. For throwing together a simple app and packaging it for Android, I have to give the win to PhoneGap.

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[ 12:09 Jun 23, 2015    More programming | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Mon, 08 Jun 2015

Adventure Dental

[Adventure Dental] This sign, in Santa Fe, always makes me do a double-take.

Would you go to a dentist or eye doctor named "Adventure Dental"?

Personally, I prefer that my dental and vision visits are as un-adventurous as possible.

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[ 08:54 Jun 08, 2015    More humor | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Tue, 02 Jun 2015

Piñon cones!

[Baby piñon cones] I've been having fun wandering the yard looking at piñon cones. We went all last summer without seeing cones on any of our trees, which seemed very mysterious ... though the book I found on piñon pines said they follow a three-year cycle. This year, nearly all of our trees have little yellow-green cones developing.

[piñon spikes with no cones] A few of the trees look like most of our piñons last year: long spikes but no cones developing on any of them. I don't know if it's a difference in the weather this year, or that three-year cycle I read about in the book. I also see on the web that there's a 2-7 year interval between good piñon crops, so clearly there are other factors.

It's going to be fun to see them develop, and to monitor them over the next several years. Maybe we'll actually get some piñon nuts eventually (or piñon jays to steal the nuts). I don't know if baby cones now means nuts later this summer, or not until next summer. Time to check that book out of the library again ...

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[ 15:20 Jun 02, 2015    More nature | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Thu, 28 May 2015

Command-line builds for Android using ant

I recently needed to update an old Android app that I hadn't touched in years. My Eclipse setup is way out of date, and I've been hearing about more and more projects switching to using command-line builds. I wanted to ditch my fiddly, difficult to install Eclipse setup and switch to something easier to use.

Some of the big open-source packages, like OsmAnd, have switched to gradle for their Java builds. So I tried to install gradle -- and on Debian, apt-get install gradle wanted to pull in a total of 153 packages! Maybe gradle wasn't the best option to pursue.

But there's another option for command-line android builds: ant. When I tried apt-get install ant, since I already have Java installed (I think the relevant package is openjdk-7-jdk), it installed without needing a single additional package. For a small program, that's clearly a better way to go!

Then I needed to create a build directory and move my project into it. That turned out to be fairly easy, too -- certainly compared to the hours it spent setting up an Eclipse environment. Here's how to set up your ant Android build:

First install the Android "Stand-alone SDK Tools" from Installing the Android SDK. This requires a fair amount of clicking around, accepting licenses, and waiting for a long download.

Now install an SDK or two. Use android sdk to install new SDK versions, and android list targets to see what versions you have installed.

Create a new directory for your project, cd into it, and then:

android create project --name YourProject --path . --target android-19 --package tld.yourdomain.YourProject --activity YourProject
Adjust the Android target for the version you want to use.

When this is done, type ant with no arguments to make sure the directory structure was created properly. If it doesn't print errors, that's a good sign.

Check that local.properties has sdk.dir set correctly. It should have picked that up from your environment.

There will be a stub source file in src/tld/yourdomain/YourProject.java. Edit it as needed, or, if you're transferring a project from another build system such as eclipse, copy the existing .java files to that directory.

If you have custom icons for your project, or other resources like layout or menu files, put them in the appropriate directories under res. The directory structure is the same as in eclipse, but unlike an eclipse build, you can edit the files at any time without the build mysteriously breaking.

Signing your app

Now you'll need a key to sign your app. Eclipse generates a debugging key automatically, but ant doesn't. It's better to use a real key anyway, since debugging keys expire and need to be regenerated periodically.

If you don't already have a key, generate one with:

keytool -genkey -v -keystore my-key.keystore -alias mykey -keyalg RSA -sigalg SHA1withRSA -keysize 2048 -validity 10000
It will ask you for a password; be sure to use one you won't forget (or record it somewhere). You can use any filename you want instead of my-key.keystore, and any alias you want instead of mykey.

Now create a file called ant.properties containing these two lines:

key.store=/path/to/my-key.keystore
key.alias=mykey
Some tutorials tell you to put this in build.properties, but that's outdated and no longer works.

If you forget your key alias, you can find out with this command and the password:

keytool -list -keystore /path/to/my-key.keystore

Optionally, you can also include your key's password:

key.store.password=xxxx
key.alias.password=xxxx
If you don't, you'll be prompted twice for the password (which echoes on the terminal, so be aware of that if anyone is bored enough to watch over your shoulder as you build packages. I guess build-signing keys aren't considered particularly high security). Of course, you should make sure not to include both the private keystore file and the password in any public code repository.

Building

Finally, you're ready to build!

ant release

If you get an error like:

AndroidManifest.xml:6: error: Error: No resource found that matches the given name (at 'icon' with value '@drawable/ic_launcher').
it's because older eclipse builds wanted icons named icon.png, while ant wants them named ic_launcher.png. You can fix this either by renaming your icons to res/drawable-hdpi/ic_launcher.png (and the same for res/drawable-lpdi and -mdpi), or by removing everything under bin (rm -rf bin/*) and then editing AndroidManifest.xml. If you don't clear bin before rebuilding, bin/AndroidManifest.xml will take precendence over the AndroidManifest.xml in the root, so you might have to edit both files.

After ant release, your binary will be in bin/YourProject-release.apk. If you have an adb connection, you can (re)install it with: adb install -r bin/YourProject-release.apk

Done! So much easier than eclipse, and you can use any editor you want, and check your files into any version control system.

That just leaves the coding part. If only Java development were as easy as Python or C ...

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[ 20:52 May 28, 2015    More programming | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Fri, 15 May 2015

Of file modes, umasks and fmasks, and mounting FAT devices

I have a bunch of devices that use VFAT filesystems. MP3 players, camera SD cards, SD cards in my Android tablet. I mount them through /etc/fstab, and the files always look executable, so when I ls -f them, they all have asterisks after their names. I don't generally execute files on these devices; I'd prefer the files to have a mode that doesn't make them look executable.

I'd like the files to be mode 644 (or 0644 in most programming languages, since it's an octal, or base 8, number). 644 in binary is 110 100 100, or as the Unix ls command puts it, rw-r--r--.

There's a directive, fmask, that you can put in fstab entries to control the mode of files when the device is mounted. (Here's Wikipedia's long umask article.) But how do you get from the mode you want the files to be, 644, to the mask?

The mask (which corresponds to the umask command) represent the bits you don't want to have set. So, for instance, if you don't want the world-execute bit (1) set, you'd put 1 in the mask. If you don't want the world-write bit (2) set, as you likely don't, put 2 in the mask. So that's already a clue that I'm going to want the rightmost byte to be 3: I don't want files mounted from my MP3 player to be either world writable or executable.

But I also don't want to have to puzzle out the details of all nine bits every time I set an fmask. Isn't there some way I can take the mode I want the files to be -- 644 -- and turn them into the mask I'd need to put in /etc/fstab or set as a umask?

Fortunately, there is. It seemed like it ought to be straightforward, but it took a little fiddling to get it into a one-line command I can type. I made it a shell function in my .zshrc:

# What's the complement of a number, e.g. the fmask in fstab to get
# a given file mode for vfat files? Sample usage: invertmask 755
invertmask() {
    python -c "print '0%o' % (~(0777 & 0$1) & 0777)"
}

This takes whatever argument I give to it -- $1 -- and takes only the three rightmost bytes from it, (0777 & 0$1). It takes the bitwise NOT of that, ~. But the result of that is a negative number, and we only want the three rightmost bytes of the result, (result) & 0777, expressed as an octal number -- which we can do in python by printing it as %o. Whew!

Here's a shorter, cleaner looking alias that does the same thing, though it's not as clear about what it's doing:

invertmask1() {
    python -c "print '0%o' % (0777 - 0$1)"
}

So now, for my MP3 player I can put this in /etc/fstab:

UUID=0000-009E /mp3 vfat user,noauto,exec,fmask=133,shortname=lower 0 0

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[ 10:27 May 15, 2015    More linux/cmdline | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Wed, 06 May 2015

Tips for passing Google's "Mobile Friendly" tests

I saw on Slashdot that Google is going to start down-rating sites that don't meet its criteria of "mobile-friendly": Are you ready for Google's 'Mobilegeddon' on Tuesday?. And from the the Slashdot discussion, it was pretty clear that Google's definition included some arbitrary hoops to jump through.

So I headed over to Google's Mobile-friendly test to check out some of my pages.

Now, most of my website seemed to me like it ought to be pretty mobile friendly. It's size agnostic: I don't specify any arbitrary page widths in pixels, so most of my pages can resize down as far as necessary (I was under the impression that was what "responsive design" meant for websites, though I've been doing it for many years and it seems now that "responsive design" includes a whole lot of phone-specific tweaks and elaborate CSS for moving things around based on size.) I also don't set font sizes that might make the page less accessible to someone with vision problems -- or to someone on a small screen with high pixel density. So I was pretty confident.

[Google's mobile-friendly test page] I shouldn't have been. Basically all of my pages failed. And in chasing down some of the problems I've learned a bit about Google's mobile rules, as well as about some weird quirks in how current mobile browsers render websites.

Basically, all of my pages failed with the same three errors:

What? I wasn't specifying text size at all -- if the text is too small to read with the default font, surely that's a bug in the mobile browser, not a bug in my website. Same with links too close together, when I'm using the browser's default line spacing.

But it turned out that the first two points were meaningless. They were just a side effect of that third error: the mobile viewport.

The mandatory meta viewport tag

It turns out that any page that doesn't add a new meta tag, called "viewport", will automatically fail Google's mobile friendly test and be downranked accordingly. What's that all about?

Apparently it's originally Apple's fault. iPhones, by default, pretend their screen is 980 pixels wide instead of the actual 320 or 640, and render content accordingly, and so they shrink everything down by a factor of 3 (980/320). They do this assuming that most website designers will set a hard limit of 980 pixels (which I've always considered to be bad design) ... and further assuming that their users care more about seeing the beautiful layout of a website than about reading the website's text.

And Google apparently felt, at some point during the Android development process, that they should copy Apple in this silly behavior. I'm not sure when Android started doing this; my Android 2.3 Samsung doesn't do it, so it must have happened later than that.

Anyway, after implementing this, Apple then introduced a meta tag you can add to an HTML file to tell iPhone browsers not to do this scaling, and to display the text at normal text size. There are various forms for this tag, but the most common is:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
(A lot of examples I found on the web at first suggested this: <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1, maximum-scale=1"> but don't do that -- it prevents people from zooming in to see more detail, and hurts the accessibility of the page, since people who need to zoom in won't be able to. Here's more on that: Stop using the viewport meta tag (until you know how to use it.)

Just to be clear, Google is telling us that in order not to have our pages downgraded, we have to add a new tag to every page on the web to tell mobile browsers not to do something silly that they shouldn't have been doing in the first place, and which Google implemented to copy a crazy thing Apple was doing.

How width and initial-scale relate

Documentation on how width and initial-scale relate to each other, and which takes precedence, are scant. Apple's documentation on the meta viewport tag says that setting initial-scale=1 automatically sets width=device-width. That implies that the two are basically equivalent: that they're only different if you want to do something else, like set a page width in pixels (use width=) or set the width to some ratio of the device width other than 1 (use initial-scale=.

That means that using initial-scale=1 should imply width=device-width -- yet nearly everyone on the web seems to use both. So I'm doing that, too. Apparently there was once a point to it: some older iPhones had a bug involving switching orientation to landscape mode, and specifying both initial-scale=1 and width=device-width helped, but supposedly that's long since been fixed.

initial-scale=2, by the way, sets the viewport to half what it would have been otherwise; so if the width would have been 320, it sets it to 160, so you'll see half as much. Why you'd want to set initial-scale to anything besides 1 in a web page, I don't know.

If the width specified by initial-scale conflicts with that specified by width, supposedly iOS browsers will take the larger of the two, while Android won't accept a width directive less than 320, according to Quirks mode: testing Meta viewport.

It would be lovely to be able to test this stuff; but my only Android device is running Android 2.3, which doesn't do all this silly zooming out. It does what a sensible small-screen device should do: it shows text at normal, readable size by default, and lets you zoom in or out if you need to.

(Only marginally related, but interesting if you're doing elaborate stylesheets that take device resolution into account, is A List Apart's discussion, A Pixel Identity Crisis.)

Control width of images

[Image with max-width 100%] Once I added meta viewport tags, most of my pages passed the test. But I was seeing something else on some of my photo pages, as well as blog pages where I have inline images:

Image pages are all about showing an image. Many of my images are wider than 320 pixels ... and thus get flagged as too wide for the screen. Note the scrollbars, and how you can only see a fraction of the image.

There's a simple way to fix this, and unlike the meta viewport thing, it actually makes sense. The solution is to force images to be no wider than the screen with this little piece of CSS:

<style type="text/css">
  img { max-width: 100%; height: auto; }
</style>

[Image with max-width 100%] I've been using similar CSS in my RSS reader for several months, and I know how much better it made the web, on news sites that insist on using 1600 pixel wide images inline in stories. So I'm happy to add it to my photo pages. If someone on a mobile browser wants to view every hair in a squirrel's tail, they can still zoom in to the page, or long-press on the image to view it at full resolution. Or rotate to landscape mode.

The CSS rule works for those wide page banners too. Or you can use overflow: hidden if the right side of your banner isn't all that important.

Anyway, that takes care of the "page too wide" problem. As for the "Links too close together" even after I added the meta viewport tag, that was just plain bad HTML and CSS, showing that I don't do enough testing on different window sizes. I fixed it so the buttons lay out better and don't draw on top of each other on super narrow screens, which I should have done long ago. Likewise for some layout problems I found on my blog.

So despite my annoyance with the whole viewport thing, Google's mandate did make me re-examine some pages that really needed fixing, and should have improved my website quite a bit for anyone looking at it on a small screen. I'm glad of that.

It'll be a while before I have all my pages converted, especially that business of adding the meta tag to all of them. But readers, if you see usability problems with my site, whether on mobile devices or otherwise, please tell me about them!

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[ 15:48 May 06, 2015    More tech/web | permalink to this entry | comments ]

Thu, 30 Apr 2015

Stile style

On a hike a few weeks ago, we encountered an unusual, and amusing, stile across the trail.

[Normal stile] It isn't uncommon to see stiles along trails. There are lots of different designs, but their purpose is to allow humans, on foot, an easy way to cross a fence, while making it difficult for vehicles and livestock like cattle to pass through. A common design looks like this, with a break in the fence and "wings" so that anything small enough to make the sharp turn can pass through.

On a recent hike starting near Buckman, on the Rio Grande, we passed a few stiles with the "wings" design; but one of the stiles we came to had a rather less common design:

[Wrongly-built stile]

It was set up so that nothing could pass without climbing over the fence -- and one of the posts which was supposed to hold fence rails was just sitting by itself, with nothing attached to it. [Pathological stile]

I suspect someone gave a diagram to a welder, and the welder, not being an outdoor person and having no idea of the purpose of a stile, welded it up without giving it much thought. Not very functional ... and not very stilish, either!

I'm curious whether the error was in the spec, or in the welder's interpretation of it. But alas, I suspect I'll never learn the story behind the stile.

Giggling, we climbed over the fence and proceeded on our hike up to the very scenic Otowi Peak.

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[ 11:38 Apr 30, 2015    More humor | permalink to this entry | comments ]