Open the X selection in a browser window, from any desktop (Shallow Thoughts)

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing, Science, and Nature.

Tue, 03 Jan 2012

Open the X selection in a browser window, from any desktop

Like most Linux users, I use virtual desktops. Normally my browser window is on a desktop of its own.

Naturally, it often happens that I encounter a link I'd like to visit while I'm on a desktop where the browser isn't visible. From some apps, I can click on the link and have it show up. But sometimes, the link is just text, and I have to select it, change to the browser desktop, paste the link into firefox, then change desktops again to do something else while the link loads.

So I set up a way to load whatever's in the X selection in firefox no matter what desktop I'm on.

In most browsers, including firefox, you can tell your existing browser window to open a new link from the command line: firefox http://example.com/ opens that link in your existing browser window if you already have one up, rather than starting another browser. So the trick is to get the text you've selected.

At first, I used a program called xclip. You can run this command: firefox `xclip -o` to open the selection. That worked okay at first -- until I hit my first URL in weechat that was so long that it was wrapped to the next line. It turns out xclip does odd things with multi-line output; depending on whether it thinks the output is a terminal or not, it may replace the newline with a space, or delete whatever follows the newline. In any case, I couldn't find a way to make it work reliably when pasted into firefox.

After futzing with xclip for a little too long, trying to reverse-engineer its undocumented newline behavior, I decided it would be easier just to write my own X clipboard app in Python. I already knew how to do that, and it's super easy once you know the trick:

mport gtk
primary = gtk.clipboard_get(gtk.gdk.SELECTION_PRIMARY)
if primary.wait_is_text_available() :
    print primary.wait_for_text()

That just prints it directly, including any newlines or spaces. But as long as I was writing my own app, why not handle that too?

It's not entirely necessary on Firefox: on Linux, Firefox has some special code to deal with pasting multi-line URLs, so you can copy a URL that spans multiple lines, middleclick in the content area and things will work. On other platforms, that's disabled, and some Linux distros disable it as well; you can enable it by going to about:config and searching for single, then setting the preference editor.singlelinepaste.pasteNewlines to 2.

However, it was easy enough to make my Python clipboard app do the right thing so it would work in any browser. I used Python's re (regular expressions) module:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import gtk
import re

primary = gtk.clipboard_get(gtk.gdk.SELECTION_PRIMARY)

if not primary.wait_is_text_available() :
    sys.exit(0)
s = primary.wait_for_text()

# eliminate newlines, and any spaces immediately following a newline:
print re.sub(r'[\r\n]+ *', '', s)

That seemed to work fine, even on long URLs pasted from weechat with newlines and spaces, like that looked like

http://example.com/long-
    url.html

All that was left was binding it so I could access it from anywhere. Of course, that varies depending on your desktop/window manager. In Openbox, I added two items to my desktop menu in menu.xml:

  <item label="open selection in Firefox">
    <action name="Execute"><execute>sh -c 'firefox `xclip -o`'</execute></action>
  </item>
  <item label="open selection in new tab">
    <action name="Execute"><execute>sh -c 'firefox -new-tab `xclip -o`'</execute></action>
  </item>

I also added some code in rc.xml inside <context name="Desktop">, so I can middle-click or control-middle-click on the desktop to open a link in the browser:

      <mousebind button="Middle" action="Press">
        <action name="Execute">
          <execute>sh -c 'firefox `pyclip`'</execute>
        </action>
      </mousebind>
      <mousebind button="C-Middle" action="Press">
        <action name="Execute">
          <execute>sh -c -new-tab 'firefox `pyclip`'</execute>
        </action>
      </mousebind>

I set this up maybe two hours ago and I've probably used it ten or fifteen times already. This is something I should have done long ago!

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[ 21:37 Jan 03, 2012    More linux | permalink to this entry | comments ]
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