Show mounted filesystems (Shallow Thoughts)

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.

Fri, 31 Mar 2017

Show mounted filesystems

Used to be that you could see your mounted filesystems by typing mount or df. But with modern Linux kernels, all sorts are implemented as virtual filesystems -- proc, /run, /sys/kernel/security, /dev/shm, /run/lock, /sys/fs/cgroup -- I have no idea what most of these things are except that they make it much more difficult to answer questions like "Where did that ebook reader mount, and did I already unmount it so it's safe to unplug it?" Neither mount nor df has a simple option to get rid of all the extraneous virtual filesystems and only show real filesystems.

http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/177014/showing-only-interesting-mount-p oints-filtering-non-interesting-types had some suggestions that got me started:

mount -t ext3,ext4,cifs,nfs,nfs4,zfs
mount | grep -E --color=never  '^(/|[[:alnum:]\.-]*:/)'
Another answer there says it's better to use findmnt --df, but that still shows all the tmpfs entries (findmnt --df | grep -v tmpfs might do the job).

And real mounts are always mounted on a filesystem path starting with /, so you can do mount | grep '^/'.

But it also turns out that mount will accept a blacklist of types as well as a whitelist: -t notype1,notype2... I prefer the idea of excluding a blacklist of filesystem types versus restricting it to a whitelist; that way if I mount something unusual like curlftpfs that I forgot to add to the whitelist, or I mount a USB stick with a filesystem type I don't use very often (ntfs?), I'll see it.

On my system, this was the list of types I had to disable (sheesh!):

mount -t nosysfs,nodevtmpfs,nocgroup,nomqueue,notmpfs,noproc,nopstore,nohugetlbfs,nodebugfs,nodevpts,noautofs,nosecurityfs,nofusectl

df is easier: like findmnt, it excludes most of those filesystem types to begin with, so there are only a few you need to exclude:

df -hTx tmpfs -x devtmpfs -x rootfs

Obviously I don't want to have to type either of those commands every time I want to check my mount list. SoI put this in my .zshrc. If you call mount or df with no args, it applies the filters, otherwise it passes your arguments through. Of course, you could make a similar alias for findmnt.

# Mount and df are no longer useful to show mounted filesystems,
# since they show so much irrelevant crap now.
# Here are ways to clean them up:
mount() {
    if [[ $# -ne 0 ]]; then
        /bin/mount $*
        return
    fi

    # Else called with no arguments: we want to list mounted filesystems.
    /bin/mount -t nosysfs,nodevtmpfs,nocgroup,nomqueue,notmpfs,noproc,nopstore,nohugetlbfs,nodebugfs,nodevpts,noautofs,nosecurityfs,nofusectl
}

df() {
    if [[ $# -ne 0 ]]; then
        /bin/df $*
        return
    fi

    # Else called with no arguments: we want to list mounted filesystems.
    /bin/df -hTx tmpfs -x devtmpfs -x rootfs
}

Update: Chris X Edwards suggests lsblk or lsblk -o 'NAME,MOUNTPOINT'. it wouldn't have solved my problem because it only shows /dev devices, not virtual filesystems like sshfs, but it's still a command worth knowing about.

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[ 12:25 Mar 31, 2017    More linux | permalink to this entry | comments ]
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