Announcing the New Mexico Bill Tracker (Shallow Thoughts)

Akkana's Musings on Open Source Computing and Technology, Science, and Nature.

Fri, 25 Jan 2019

Announcing the New Mexico Bill Tracker

For the last few weeks I've been consumed with a project I started last year and then put aside for a while: a bill tracker.

The project sprung out of frustration at the difficulty of following bills as they pass through the New Mexico legislature. Bills I was interested in would die in committee, or they would make it to a vote, and I'd read about it a few days later and wish I'd known that it was a good time to write my representative or show up at the Roundhouse to speak. (I've never spoken at the Roundhouse, and whether I'd have the courage to actually do it remains to be seen, but at least I'd like to have the chance to decide.)

New Mexico has a Legislative web site where you can see the status of each bill, and they even offer a way to register and save a list of bills; but then there's no way to get alerts about bills that change status and might be coming up for debate.

New Mexico legislative sessions are incredibly short: 60 days in odd years, 30 days in even. During last year's 30-day session, I wrote some Python code that scraped the HTML pages describing a bill, extract the useful information like when the bill last changed status and where it was right now, present the information in a table where the user could easily scan it, and email the user a daily summary. Fortunately, the nmlegis.gov site, while it doesn't offer raw data for bill status, at least uses lots of id tags in its HTML which make them relatively easy to scrape.

Then the session ended and there was no further way to test it, since bills' statuses were no longer changing. So the billtracker moved to the back burner.

In the runup to this year's 60-day session, I started with Flask, a lightweight Python web library I've used for a couple of small projects, and added some extensions that help Flask handle tasks like user accounts. Then I patched in the legislative web scraping code from last year, and the result was The New Mexico Bill Tracker. I passed the word to some friends in the League of Women Voters and the Sierra Club to help me test it, and I think (hope) it's ready for wider testing.

There's lots more I'd like to do, of course. I still have no way of knowing when a bill will be up for debate. It looks like this year the Legislative web site is showing committ schedules in a fairly standard way, as opposed to the unparseable PDFs they used in past years, so I may be able to get that. Not that legislative committees actually stick to their published schedules; but at least it's a start.

New Mexico readers (or anyone else interested in following the progress of New Mexico bills) are invited to try it. Let me know about any problems you encounter. And if you want to adapt the billtracker for use in another state, send me a note! I'd love to see it extended and would be happy to work with you. Here's the source: BillTracker on GitHub.

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[ 12:34 Jan 25, 2019    More politics | permalink to this entry | comments ]
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